Exclusive interview with Ag Minister: the code, the levy and a lack of leadership

In an interview with Milk Maid Marian, the federal Minister for Agriculture and Water Resources, David Littleproud, has made some extraordinary comments.

The Minister:

  1. is open to a levy on a range of dairy products (not just milk) if industry asks;
  2. believes a retail levy should be imposed until there is “market purity”, which means true competition for milk at the farmgate;
  3. says the supermarkets have a big role to play in the sustainability of Australia’s dairy industry;
  4. wants industry to come to him with ideas about how to halt the exodus of dairy farmers but says the ADF has not made any requests of him that would address farm profitability.

I hope the interview stimulates debate about how our industry has responded to the crisis over two years. Worth watching all the way to the end, so grab a cuppa.

 

 

What’s stopping us?

red stop sign

Photo by Pixabay on Pexels.com

Like an oozing sore on the ankle of Australian dairy, the frustration with the inaction of our national umbrella body has finally broken into an open wound.

Months after releasing its report into our woes, the ACCC has released a guide to the recommendations in an apparent attempt to build momentum.

Meanwhile, the federal agriculture minister, David Littleproud, has delivered dairy leaders an ultimatum backed up by a statement issued yesterday that includes this slap in the face for our representatives:

“The ACCC report into the sector identified market failure. I asked the dairy sector to come to a united position on a response to the report and a mandatory code of conduct for the dairy industry. This has not yet happened.”

Apparently, they have until tomorrow to be forthcoming, or else.

Yesterday, Minister Littleproud threw his support behind a 10 cent levy on milk to help farmers. Today, the new Prime Minister, Scott Morrison poured cold water on the idea.

Two years have passed. The silver lining to any crisis is change. We’ve seen none. Why? Who or what is stopping us?

 

ADF answers questions about the dairy code

Australia’s peak dairy representative body, Australian Dairy Farmers (ADF), has not yet joined the ACCC and all but one of the state dairy bodies in calling for a mandatory code that would govern the interactions between farmers and processors.

I’m grateful to ADF’s President, Terry Richardson, for answering four questions about the ADF’s approach for Milk Maid Marian.

Terry Richardson2lores

Terry Richardson, ADF president

1. Does the ADF accept the ACCC’s finding that the voluntary code was not effective enough?
TR: ADF accepts the ACCC findings that the current industry Code had a positive impact on contracting practices but has been unable to secure participation by all processors, reduce risk and strengthen bargaining power for farmers, independently arbitrate complaints or penalise breaches.

When the Code was introduced, it was agreed that a review would occur twelve months of operation. This included an assessment of its strengths and weaknesses in the context of the ACCC report and industry feedback.

We were aware at the start of the code review process that the next version of the industry Code must have such procedures in place.

It is important to recognise that prior to 1 July 2017, there was no Code of Practice for Contractual Arrangements in the dairy industry, and Australian Dairy Farmers was pivotal in making this difficult yet important first step.

2. If you are still committed to the review of the voluntary code, what resources does ADF have that were unavailable to the ACCC and may have hindered its review?
TR: It is incorrect to assume that the ADIC is conducting its own review with the aim of coming to a different conclusion to the ACCC. The ACCC and ADIC reviews have different objectives.

The ADIC review is focused entirely on how the voluntary code operated, what elements were successful and what needs improving in a new Code of Practice.

We found that relatively little of the ACCC report considered the operation of the current dairy industry Code of Practice despite the shortcomings.

Our concern with the ACCC report was that in recommending a mandatory code of practice, the ACCC did not conduct an assessment against the Australian Government’s threshold test nor did it provide adequate analysis on how this new code would operate.

It is our understanding that it is difficult to amend or alter a mandatory code once it is enacted if farmers determine at some future time that they are unhappy with its operation.

It has been incorrectly assumed that continuing with the ADIC review is an indication that the Council or ADF is opposed to a mandatory code of practice. That is not true.

The ACCC report broadly discussed the different types of codes but we need to review all options and communicate to farmers the benefits and shortcomings of each.

These are significant decisions for the dairy industry and farmers should expect that ADF forms a view that is underpinned by detailed analysis

3. What steps has the ADF taken in response to the ACCC report?
TR: ADF, in conjunction with the Australian Dairy Industry Council, is using the ACCC report as a springboard to revise and strengthen the Code of Practice and act on the other recommendations contained in the report.

We are working with a legal firm who has considerable experience in working with industry codes. While this legal advice is in its early stages, we will work through number of key amendments that should be included in a new dairy industry code, including a dispute resolution mechanism and penalties procedure that would ensure compliance.

We are also using the ACCC Guide to Industry Codes of Practice to ensure a strengthened code is consistent with best practice.

4. What are the next steps and their timeframes?
TR: The introduction of a Mandatory Code would take 15-18 months, and with a federal election scheduled for the first half of 2019, this timeline could be extended as government moves into caretaker mode during an election.

Preparing a strengthened industry Code including dispute resolution procedures is the next step, and we expect this to be complete in the next couple of months.

This work is complex and ADF is proceeding one step at a time, recognising the urgency of moving this work forward.

Thank you, Terry Richardson, for explaining ADF’s approach to a dairy code!