A new big Aussie dairy co-op?

ReneDedoncker

Fonterra Australia’s managing director, René Dedoncker

“It’ll be months, not years,” says Fonterra Australia’s managing director, René Dedoncker when I ask him about plans to form a new big Australian dairy co-op.

Industry veterans will tell you the idea of Fonterra forming an Australian co-op is not new and seemed a real possibility after the demise of that other great milk co-op, Bonlac, in the early 2000s. So, why now?

“I think the time is right,” says René. “This is a value proposition at a time when the industry is fragile.”

“Fonterra Australia is also in a great position to reduce risk. We have learnt from our mistakes and have a stable, repeatable business model with a balanced customer and product mix. Confidence, if not trust, is running high.”

I cough a little nervously and ask René how he expects farmers would rate Fonterra in the trust stakes and whether that might be a problem.

“Trust may well be a stumbling block.” he concedes. “Farmers – even those who’ve been supplying us for many years – tell me it will take years to rebuild. Purely on trust, we could well be ranked quite low but we are working hard to regain that.”

“I can tell you that there is not a key decision made without the input of farmer voices.”

The consultation on the co-op idea will officially begin at the Bonlac Supply Company AGM next week and be discussed at farmer forums across the country.

If it gets a sufficiently warm welcome, the next stage in the process will be discussions about the form the co-op would take.

“We already have several different models in mind,” René says, “but at this stage we want to keep it simple and see whether there’s an appetite for this co-op.”

What Rene can say is that there won’t be a mandatory requirement for farmer suppliers to “share up”, matching share numbers to milk production.

“We need to make it attractive and give everyone an opportunity to participate. Farmers will also be able to supply Fonterra Australia without becoming shareholders,” he explains.

It’s also decided that the shares would be in the Australian operation only, rather than the global Fonterra organisation. The Australian co-op has the blessing of the board of directors but would not need to clear a Kiwi shareholder vote.

The plans towards forming a co-op has “paused” the progress of a replacement for the Bonlac Supply Agreement, René says. While that replacement has already been drafted, it won’t be made public until it’s clear it would suit any new co-op model.

It has done nothing, however, to dampen Fonterra’s Australian expansion plans. The processor has already committed to lifting its processing capacity by another half-a-billion litres over the next six months and will add another half-a-billion within 18 months.

While René stresses that the 3 billion litre target is in capacity rather than milk supply (allowing enough headroom for a bumper season), he says the processor is aiming for a milk supply of 2.6 to 2.7 billion litres within two years.

At the same time, Lino Saputo Jr is on record saying Warrnambool Cheese & Butter will win back the milk MG lost. And, of course, the main beneficiaries were Fonterra and WCB itself.

“What about Saputo?,” I ask.

“We’re running our own race,” says René. “We have incredible confidence in our business and they’re offering powerful competition that’s good for our industry.”

“It might be better to ask Saputo about us.”

About the loss of MG

“We are stealing from the graves of our founding fathers and the cribs of our children,” were the words of former co-op chairman Ian MacAulay after the vote in favour of MG’s partial float was passed.

History has proven him right and it’s a travesty for our industry.

I’m not going to dwell here on how it feels because I’m sure that, by now, you’ve heard from plenty of others and my story is by no means unique.

All I can offer you is a list of questions for MG to help explain what comes next and the implications of the agreement it’s signed with Saputo. I’ve been assured they will respond but, understandably, it might take a little time.