Inconvenient dairy truths

I am not a spokesperson for the dairy community. I’m simply an average dairy farmer who likes to write.

The way my family cares for our cows is very typical of what happens on farms right across Australia. It’s important that more of us share what we do, why we do it and why that matters with non-farming Australians because there is much to be proud of.

It’s equally important that average dairy farmers like me are constantly challenged to do better and that we, in turn, challenge others involved in dairy to improve the way we care for our land and cows.

I am ashamed when dairy spokespeople try to defend the indefensible actions of the minority of farmers who cling onto practices that the rest of us wouldn’t entertain. It’s embarrassing that I have done so little to try to influence them to represent (and lead) all of us.

Someone who has gone beyond the call in her role as Dairy Australia’s animal welfare manager is Bridget Peachey, who was never afraid to tell the good stories and work with farmers to lift our standards. Bridget leaves DA this week and I will miss her leadership, knowledge and sense of what really matters to farmers and the animals in our care.

3 Comments

Filed under Animal Health and Welfare, Community

3 responses to “Inconvenient dairy truths

  1. Steph Coombes

    What sort of practices would you like to see gone Marian?

    Like

  2. Ilana L

    Thank you. As a goat person who grew up on a sheep and beef cattle family property conern, I had never seen tail docking and I must admit I could not see the sense in it. Apart from the fact, the cow then has no protection from insect pests. It just seems more convenient for some farmers.
    Mulsing sheep is a necessary practice where I grew up as it prevents flystrike in wrinkley Merino breeds. Tail docking, I could not see the sense in it.

    Like

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